Advanced Spatial Analysis


This website is preserved as an Archive for the NIH-funded GISPopSci / Advanced Spatial Analysis Training Programs (2005–2013). Current resources in support of
Spatially Integrated Social Science
are now available at the following:

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www.spatial.ucsb.edu
gispopsci-logo
www.gispopsci.org
teachspatial-logo
www.teachspatial.org

PSU 2011 June 19–June 24, 2011: State College, PA

Spatial Regression Modeling


Program Principal Investigator

Stephen A. Matthews (E-mail: matthews@pop.psu.edu) is Associate Professor of Sociology, Anthropology and Demography (Courtesy in Geography); Director, Geographic Information Analysis Core at the Population Research Institute, Social Science Research Institute, Penn State. His research focuses on families and neighborhoods in diverse community contexts and the application of GIS and spatial methods in demographic, health and social science research. He serves as PI on both an NIEHS funded quasi-experimental study of neighborhood food environments, diet, and health and an NICHD R25 training grant on advanced spatial analysis. Matthews has served on numerous NIH review panels including Community Influences on Health Behavior (CIHB), special panels (e.g., Cancer and GIS; Infrastructure for Data Sharing and Archiving) and on the editorial board of Health and Place (1994-2004) and American Journal of Preventive Medicine (2005-present). He was PI on the initial GIS and Population Science (GISPopSci) training grant (2005-2007). More information about Matthews is available at: http://cairo.pop.psu.edu/CtrPRI/DirBio.cfm?PeopleID=32.

Workshop Instructors

Paul R. Voss (Email: Paul_Voss@unc.edu) is Professor Emeritus of Rural Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His prior affiliations include Demographic Specialist with the University of Wisconsin's Division of Cooperative Extension and Research Affiliate with the Wisconsin Applied Population Laboratory, and the Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology. Presently, Dr. Voss is Senior Spatial Analyst with The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, Research Professor of Sociology and a Fellow with The Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also is a Research Associate with the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester University, England.

Dr. Voss received his Ph.D. in sociology/demography from the University of Michigan in 1975 and has specialized for most of his professional career in modeling the processes of demographic change in small geographic areas, with particular emphasis on estimation and forecasting. Over the past decade, Dr. Voss has turned his attention to the proper specification and estimation of regression models when analyzing geographically referenced data. He teaches a graduate seminar in spatial data analysis for social scientists. With with Katherine Curtis and others he has led 5-day workshops on spatial regression techniques in the U.S. and Europe. More information about Dr. Voss is available at
http://www.irss.unc.edu/odum/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=527.

Katherine Curtis (Email: kcurtis@ssc.wisc.edu) is an Assistant Profressor in the Department of Rural Sociology at the Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison, and is affiliated with the Wisconsin Applied Population Laboratory and the Environmental Resources Center. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Washington. Dr. Curtis' interests include migration and population redistribution, inequality, land use, and spatial statistics. Her research examines historical economic, social, and demographic shifts in three regions (Puerto Rico, the U.S. Great Plains, and the South) and the spatial distribution of poverty in the contemporary U.S. In Puerto Rico, she investigates the influence of the economic transition on inequality that followed U.S. governance in the early decades of the 1900s and has focused on the relationship between systems of crop production and racial inequality. A second area of research examines population change in the Great Plains over the 20th century, using spatial regression techniques to assess the relative influence of correlates of population change advanced in theories of urbanization. In a third area of research, Dr. Curtis focuses on the migration of southern Americans to the non-south (the Great Migration) and the return to the South (the Return Migration). Her work, published in Demography and Social Science History, demonstrates the interplay of racial and gender inequality in settlement patterns and the consequences of migration. She has recently turned attention to the historical processes underlying contemporary patterns of persistent poverty among U.S. counties and is developing spatio-temporal models to directly measure legacy effects in the prevalence of county poverty.

Before joining the University of Wisconsin (in 2007), Dr. Curtis was on faculty in the Department of Sociology at Brown University, where she was an affiliate of the Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences Initiative, the Population Studies and Training Center, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.
More information, see:
http://www.drs.wisc.edu/faculty/curtis/.

Participants

  • Maria Awal
    Affiliation: University of Notre Dame / Indiana University South Bend
    Research Interest: Epidemiology

  • Michael Barton
    Affiliation: University at Albany, SUNY
    Research Interest: Sociology

  • Caleb Benjamin
    Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
    Research Interest: Regional Science

  • Mark Bjelland
    Affiliation: Gustavus Adolphus College
    Research Interest: Geography

  • Sarah Cannon
    Affiliation: Northwestern University
    Research Interest: Economics

  • Suzanne Lanyi Charles
    Affiliation: University of Michigan
    Research Interest: Urban and Regional Planning

  • David Clark
    Affiliation: Maine Medical Center
    Research Interest: Health Sciences

  • Jamaica Corker
    Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Dustin Duncan
    Affiliation: Harvard School of Public Health
    Research Interest: Epidemiology

  • David Eagle
    Affiliation: Duke University
    Research Interest: Sociology

  • Megan Gall
    Affiliation: University at Buffalo, SUNY
    Research Interest: Political Science

  • Jared McGuirt
    Affiliation: University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
    Research Interest: Health Planning

  • David Mitchell
    Affiliation: University of South Alabama and University of Central Arkansas
    Research Interest: Economics

  • Victoria Morckel
    Affiliation: Ohio State University
    Research Interest: Urban and Regional Planning

  • Adam Myers
    Affiliation: University of Texas at Austin
    Research Interest: Political Science

  • Jeffrey Napierala
    Affiliation: University at Albany, SUNY
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Claudia Nau
    Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Aggie Noah
    Affiliation: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
    Research Interest: Sociology

  • Collin Payne
    Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Nicholas Rajkovich
    Affiliation: University of Michigan
    Research Interest: Urban and Regional Planning

  • Clayton Schupp
    Affiliation: Cancer Prevention Institute of California
    Research Interest: Epidemiology

  • Kevin Stofan
    Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University World Campus
    Research Interest: Geography

  • Elizabeth Sully
    Affiliation: Princeton University
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Tim A. Thomas
    Affiliation: University of Washington
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Megan Todd
    Affiliation: Princeton University
    Research Interest: Demography

  • Rachael Weiss
    Affiliation: CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College
    Research Interest: Epidemiology